Photo by Greg Rosenke on Unsplash

His name was Tommy. He was fifteen and had a quick, nervous, smiling habit of looking away whenever someone would ask him a personal question, or any question at all really. His mother, who knew everybody and everything, somehow never heard his responses to her questions often scolded Tommy about that habit, “HAH? Speak up honey. Nobody will ever hear you if you keep mumbling like that.” Tommy would look at his shoes or at the cracks in the sidewalk, nodding while subtly toggling the volume controls for his headphones in his pocket through faded denim. …


You aren’t alone. Most of us dread our morning commutes to the office. But we can do something about it — and it isn’t quitting or traveling abroad.

A millennial woman who feels depressed sits at her desk, clutching her forehead and looking at her phone.
A millennial woman who feels depressed sits at her desk, clutching her forehead and looking at her phone.
JGI/Tom Grill/Getty Images

It’s hard to talk about. But over the past five years, depression rates among Millennials have grown by 47% according to this study of 55 million people.

That’s 540,000 more Millennials suffering from depression in the United States alone. I’m certainly one unit in that staggering statistic.

This epidemic affects so many of us — graduate students, baristas, software engineers, musicians, teachers, entire families. Yet nobody talks about it.

So, why the…

Michael Keller

A writer, poet and healer who enjoys getting lost in new worlds.

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